A Celebration of Farm Raised Fiber!

My fiber journey is a long one. From owning a retail yarn shop, to building a wholesale yarn business selling hand dyed yarns and original patterns to over 150 yarn shops across the country...to finding an old farm place in the heart of Virginia that needed a bit of TLC
All this has lead me to creating our family farm, Sweet Tree Hill Farm on a hill under 100 year old walnut and pecan trees. I have always loved the history and large selection of natural colors of Shetland Sheep. So we now raise registered Shetlands, also Angora rabbits, cashmere goats and chickens (not for fiber, just for fun and breakfast.) My chief goal has been to develop a fingering weight yarn in many natural and dyed colors...that can be used for Fair Isle and lace knitting and even on antique circular sock machines, We have reached this goal. We now do yearly batches of this yarn in 8 natural colors and a growing collection of dyed and over dyed yarns. We market it to individuals and now we are beginning to offer it to yarn shops. The next step is developing patterns. This fall, we launched our first pattern at the Shenandoah Valley Fiber Festival, The Fair Isle Thistle cape. (Find it in the pattern section.)

1910 Socks....We now offer hand knitted socks using our new yarn on a very old circular sock machine, knitted in a very old farmhouse built in 1910. Our socks are old school...not superprocessed (with battery acid and chlorine..ugh!) into superwash...but minimally processed keeping the natural wool properties of warmth, longevity and comfort. Each pair is unique and includes a little bobbin of extra yarn for darning purposes, should the need arise.

Through the work of raising the animals, who all have names and whom we build relationships with...And onto working with the fiber, I have discovered that this is sacred work, like a calling.  And even the simple process of washing and preparing the wool is a joy. So enjoy the shop, as each day providing yarn, roving, fiber dye and NOW SOCKS!... is not a job, but a celebration.